Sunday, September 28, 2014 Saturday, September 27, 2014 Saturday, September 20, 2014 Friday, September 19, 2014
Medieval pirates tended to lack the sartorial style of their 18th century counterparts.
(The figure at far left is Alexander the Great; the bare-legged man next to him is a pirate. From Confessio amantis, c. 1470, on the pirates linkspage.)

Medieval pirates tended to lack the sartorial style of their 18th century counterparts.

(The figure at far left is Alexander the Great; the bare-legged man next to him is a pirate. From Confessio amantis, c. 1470, on the pirates linkspage.)

Imperial Augsburg at Vassar

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Imperial Augsburg: Renaissance Prints and Drawings, 1475-1540 is at the Frances Lehman Loeb Art Center at Vassar College through December 14.

Imperial Augsburg: Renaissance Prints and Drawings, 1475-1540

Thursday, September 18, 2014
Ming: 50 years that changed China is at the British Museum through January 5.
Between AD 1400 and 1450, China was a global superpower run by one family – the Ming dynasty – who established Beijing as the capital and built the Forbidden City. During this period, Ming China was thoroughly connected with the outside world. Chinese artists absorbed many fascinating influences, and created some of the most beautiful objects and paintings ever made.  The exhibition will feature a range of these spectacular objects – including exquisite porcelain, gold, jewellery, furniture, paintings, sculptures and textiles – from museums across China and the rest of the world. Many of them have only been very recently discovered and have never been seen outside China.

Ming: 50 years that changed China is at the British Museum through January 5.

Between AD 1400 and 1450, China was a global superpower run by one family – the Ming dynasty – who established Beijing as the capital and built the Forbidden City. During this period, Ming China was thoroughly connected with the outside world. Chinese artists absorbed many fascinating influences, and created some of the most beautiful objects and paintings ever made.

The exhibition will feature a range of these spectacular objects – including exquisite porcelain, gold, jewellery, furniture, paintings, sculptures and textiles – from museums across China and the rest of the world. Many of them have only been very recently discovered and have never been seen outside China.
Sunday, September 14, 2014 Saturday, September 13, 2014
Nasta‛liq: The Genius of Persian Calligraphy is at the Arthur M. Sackler Gallery in Washington, DC through March 22.

Nasta‛liq: The Genius of Persian Calligraphy is the first exhibition of its kind to focus on nasta‛liq, a calligraphic script that developed in the fourteenth century in Iran and remains one of the most expressive forms of aesthetic refinement in Persian culture to this day. More than twenty works ranging in date from 1400 to 1600, the height of nasta‛liq’s development, tell the story of the script’s transformation from a simple conveyer of the written word to an artistic form of its own. The narrative thread emphasizes the achievements of four of the greatest master calligraphers — Mir Ali Tabrizi, Sultan Ali Mashhadi, Mir Ali Haravi, and Mir Imad Hasani — whose manuscripts and individual folios are still appreciated not only for their content but also for their technical virtuosity and visual quality.

Nasta‛liq: The Genius of Persian Calligraphy is at the Arthur M. Sackler Gallery in Washington, DC through March 22.

Nasta‛liq: The Genius of Persian Calligraphy is the first exhibition of its kind to focus on nasta‛liq, a calligraphic script that developed in the fourteenth century in Iran and remains one of the most expressive forms of aesthetic refinement in Persian culture to this day. More than twenty works ranging in date from 1400 to 1600, the height of nasta‛liq’s development, tell the story of the script’s transformation from a simple conveyer of the written word to an artistic form of its own. The narrative thread emphasizes the achievements of four of the greatest master calligraphers — Mir Ali Tabrizi, Sultan Ali Mashhadi, Mir Ali Haravi, and Mir Imad Hasani — whose manuscripts and individual folios are still appreciated not only for their content but also for their technical virtuosity and visual quality.
Friday, September 12, 2014
The Real Tudors: Kings and Queens Rediscovered is at the National Portrait Gallery in London through March 1.
This special display, focusing on the portraiture of the Tudor monarchs, will allow visitors to rediscover these well-known kings and queens through the most complete presentation of their images staged to date. Works from the Gallery’s Collection will be presented alongside exceptional loans and a prized possession of each monarch, as well as recent research undertaken as part of the Making Art in Tudor Britain project, to help visitors understand how and why such images were made. The display includes the Gallery’s oldest portrait, that of Henry VII, which will be displayed with a Book of Hours inscribed by the king to his daughter; six portraits of Henry VIII, including a full-length portrait from Petworth House in Sussex, together with his rosary; portraits of Edward VI and a page from his diary in which he reports his father’s death; five portraits of Mary I combined with her Prayer Book loaned from Westminster Cathedral; and several portraits of Elizabeth I displayed alongside her locket ring. The search for a ‘real’ portrait of Lady Jane Grey in the sixteenth century will also be discussed through the display of a commemorative portrait of Jane that dates from the Elizabethan period.A beautifully illustrated catalogue with over fifty reproduced portraits, and including the findings from recent technical analysis, is available.

The Real Tudors: Kings and Queens Rediscovered is at the National Portrait Gallery in London through March 1.

This special display, focusing on the portraiture of the Tudor monarchs, will allow visitors to rediscover these well-known kings and queens through the most complete presentation of their images staged to date.

Works from the Gallery’s Collection will be presented alongside exceptional loans and a prized possession of each monarch, as well as recent research undertaken as part of the Making Art in Tudor Britain project, to help visitors understand how and why such images were made.

The display includes the Gallery’s oldest portrait, that of Henry VII, which will be displayed with a Book of Hours inscribed by the king to his daughter; six portraits of Henry VIII, including a full-length portrait from Petworth House in Sussex, together with his rosary; portraits of Edward VI and a page from his diary in which he reports his father’s death; five portraits of Mary I combined with her Prayer Book loaned from Westminster Cathedral; and several portraits of Elizabeth I displayed alongside her locket ring. The search for a ‘real’ portrait of Lady Jane Grey in the sixteenth century will also be discussed through the display of a commemorative portrait of Jane that dates from the Elizabethan period.

A beautifully illustrated catalogue with over fifty reproduced portraits, and including the findings from recent technical analysis, is available.